Genesis 26 (ESV)

Now there was a famine in the land, besides the former famine that was in the days of Abraham. And Isaac went to Gerar to Abimelech king of the Philistines. 2 And the Lord appeared to him and said, “Do not go down to Egypt; dwell in the land of which I shall tell you. 3 Sojourn in this land, and I will be with you and will bless you, for to you and to your offspring I will give all these lands, and I will establish the oath that I swore to Abraham your father. 4 I will multiply your offspring as the stars of heaven and will give to your offspring all these lands. And in your offspring all the nations of the earth shall be blessed, 5 because Abraham obeyed my voice and kept my charge, my commandments, my statutes, and my laws.” 6 So Isaac settled in Gerar. 7 When the men of the place asked him about his wife, he said, “She is my sister,” for he feared to say, “My wife,” thinking, “lest the men of the place should kill me because of Rebekah,” because she was attractive in appearance. 8 When he had been there a long time, Abimelech king of the Philistines looked out of a window and saw Isaac laughing with Rebekah his wife. 9 So Abimelech called Isaac and said, “Behold, she is your wife. How then could you say, ‘She is my sister’?” Isaac said to him, “Because I thought, ‘Lest I die because of her’” . . . Continue Reading


Like Father, Like Son.

“The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.” “Sins of the father.” “Like father, like son.” These well-known idioms are on full display throughout Genesis 26 – both the good and not-so-good.

A Few “Goods”

God made a covenant with Isaac because his father Abraham obeyed His voice, kept His charge, His commandments, His statutes and His laws (Genesis 26:2-5).

We also read that Isaac built an altar and called on the name of the Lord (Genesis 26:25) just like his father Abraham did (Genesis 12:7; Genesis 12:8; Genesis 13:18; Genesis 22:9).

In Genesis 26:1-2 we read, “Now there was a famine in the land, besides the former famine that was in the days of Abraham. And Isaac went to Gerar to Abimelech king of the Philistines. 2 And the Lord appeared to him and said, ‘Do not go down to Egypt; dwell in the land of which I shall tell you.'” Although Abraham sojourned to Egypt when the famine hit the land, (Genesis 12:10), he did end up in Gerar (Genesis 20:1).

Like Abraham, Isaac listened to God and obeyed.

A Few “Not-So-Goods”

In Genesis 12:11-13 it says, “When he [Abraham] was about to enter Egypt, he said to Sarai his wife, ‘I know that you are a woman beautiful in appearance, 12 and when the Egyptians see you, they will say, ‘This is his wife.’ Then they will kill me, but they will let you live. 13 Say you are my sister, that it may go well with me because of you, and that my life may be spared for your sake.” And again in Genesis 20:2 when Abraham journeyed to Gerar we read, “And Abraham said of Sarah his wife, “She is my sister.” And Abimelech king of Gerar sent and took Sarah.”

When Abimelech confronts Abraham about deceiving him by saying Sarah was his sister and bringing guilt on him and closing all the wombs of his house, Abimelech gives Abraham gifts to prove their innocence and vindicate them in front of all the people. Abimelech also tells Abraham, “Behold, my land is before you; dwell where it pleases you” (Genesis 20:15).

Like his father Abraham, Isaac had some “interactions” with Abimelech, king of the Philistines while in Gerar.

After Isaac settles in Gerar (Genesis 26:6), he tells the men of the place that Rebekah was his sister instead of his wife “lest the men of the place should kill me because of Rebekah.” Abimelech looks out his window at Isaac and Rebekah laughing and realizes Rebekah is not Isaac’s sister but his wife.

When Abimelech confronts Isaac about deceiving him, remembering what God did to him and his house all those years ago, he tells everyone, “Whoever touches this man or his wife shall surely be put to death.” But like Abraham, Abimelech did not kick them out but allowed them to stay . . . at least for a while.

Thank you for reading my daily online journal today. Far from commentaries these are just my initial thoughts after reflecting on what I’ve read from a chapter in God’s Word each morning. This not only helps me apply what I’ve read because I’m reflecting and sharing instead of only reading but it also allows me to encourage others to prayerfully consider doing the same.

In His Care,

~Scott Quillin